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Raven Elementary School Title I Plan 2016-17
Posted On:
Monday, June 06, 2016
Title I Plan 2016-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raven Elementary School

Title I Plan

2016-2017

 

 

 

Written June 2016


 

Planning Team

 

Ann Walls                       Principal

Emma Fisher                   Title I Teacher

Valerie Rose                    Title I Teacher

Amanda Kitts                  Parent

Chris Kitts                       Parent

Larissa Belcher               Parent

Ashley Dales                   Parent

Alice Dye                        Parent

Debbie Vencill                Primary Teacher

Jennie Shortridge           Intermediate Teacher

 


Table of Contents

Comprehensive Needs Assessment                                               4

Schoolwide Reform Strategies                                                      19

Instruction by Highly Qualified Professionals                            23

Professional Development                                                             26

Strategies to Hire Highly Qualified Teachers                               28

Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement                                 29

Preschool Transition Strategies                                                     36

Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions             37

Effective and Timely Assistance                                                   38

Coordination and Integration                                                        41

Appendix A                                                                                     43

Appendix B                                                                                     44

Appendix C                                                                                     45

Appendix D                                                                                     47


 

1.  Comprehensive Needs Assessment:

A comprehensive needs assessment was conducted during the 2015-16 year as part of the School Improvement Plan.  Data from the following assessments are included:  Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS), Measures of Academic Progress (MAP), Standards of Learning (SOL), and kindergarten screener.  See Appendix C for a list of assessments given. This needs assessment also includes data from a parent survey (see Appendix D).   As designated by the School Improvement Plan, we are required to analyze the needs and create a comprehensive plan that addresses the needs of our lower achieving students.  During the 2015-16 school year, the data was disaggregated by the principal, classroom teachers, Title I teachers, Special Education teachers, and PALS tutors. 

            The Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) tests are given in conjunction with a grant through the Tazewell County Reading Initiative.  MAP is a nationally normed computer-based test built on 30 years of research and refinement.  Students are presented with test questions that adapt to different levels of difficulty and adjust based on their responses.  This test provides teachers, students, and parents with an accurate assessment of a student’s achievement.  MAP data information can be used for instructional planning for individual students or an entire class.  MAP tests in reading and math are given three times per year and the data is charted.  Individual and classroom growth is measured.

             The divisions for classifying students on the MAP testing are as follows:

  • Red                 0-25 percentile
  • Yellow            26-49  percentile
  • Green              50-99  percentile

 

 

 

The following charts show the percent of students in each band throughout the year.

 

MAP Reading Data-Kindergarten

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

9

10

10

26-49

18

24

10

50-99

73

67

81

 

 

MAP Reading Data-First Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

20

23

27

26-49

7

23

37

50-99

73

54

47

 

 

 

MAP Reading Data-Second Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

32

39

21

26-49

13

10

21

50-99

55

52

57

 

 

 

 MAP Reading Data-Third Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

26

17

9

26-49

17

30

13

50-99

57

52

78

 

 

 

 

MAP Reading Data-Fourth Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

14

14

12

26-49

29

29

12

50-99

57

57

77

 

 

 

MAP Reading Data-Fifth Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

5

14

5

26-49

24

19

38

50-96

71

67

57

Another piece of data that was disaggregated and studied was the percent of students reading at or above the 50th percentile in each grade.  The expectation would be for the percent of students reading above the 50th percentile to continue to rise throughout the year.

The results of that are shown in the following table.  There was a significant drop in the percent of first graders at benchmark in the spring due to the fact that first graders took the MAP 2-5 level test.  Third and fourth grades showed significant growth from fall to spring while fifth grade showed loss.

 

 

Percent of Students Above the 50th Percentile

Reading

Grade

Fall

Winter

Spring

Kindergarten

73

67

81

First

73

54

47

Second

55

52

57

Third

57

52

78

Fourth

57

57

77

Fifth

71

67

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

While the data for students above the 50th percentile is constantly being evaluated, the data for those children in the bottom quartile also needs to be carefully analyzed to make sure more students are not falling further behind.  In order to do this, the percent of students in the bottom quartile was tallied for each testing session.  The expectation would be for the percent of students in the bottom quartile to decrease as the year progresses.

The results are in the following chart.  For most grades the percent of students in the bottom quartile stayed fairly consistent or dropped.  Second and third grades showed the greatest decrease in students in the bottom quartile (second from 32% to 21% and third from 26% to 9%).

 

 

Percent of Students Below the 26th Percentile

Reading

Grade

Fall

Winter

Spring

Kindergarten

9

10

10

First

20

23

27

Second

32

39

21

Third

26

17

9

Fourth

14

14

12

Fifth

5

14

5

 

 

 

 

MAP math testing was conducted in grades K-5 three times during the school year.  The following tables show the percentage of students in each band.

 

MAP Math Data-Kindergarten

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

5

10

10

26-49

18

14

14

50-96

77

76

76

 

 

MAP Math Data-First Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

20

23

27

26-49

13

38

27

50-96

67

38

47

 

 

 

MAP Math Data-Second Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

13

26

21

26-49

26

35

14

50-96

61

39

64

 

 

MAP Math Data-Third Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

17

22

26

26-49

30

26

26

50-96

52

52

48

 

 

 

MAP Math Data-Fourth Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

7

11

12

26-49

21

21

15

50-96

71

68

73

 

 

MAP Math Data-Fifth Grade

Percentile

Fall

Winter

Spring

0-25

19

24

24

26-49

5

14

14

50-96

76

62

62

 

 

Another piece of data that was disaggregated and studied was the percent of students at or above the 50th percentile in each grade.  The expectation would be for the percent of students performing at or above the 50th percentile in math to continue to rise throughout the year.

The results of that are shown in the following table.  Most grades remained consistent.  There was a significant drop in first and fifth grades.

 

 

 

Percent of Students Above the 50th Percentile

Math

Grade

Fall

Winter

Spring

Kindergarten

77

76

76

First

67

38

47

Second

61

39

64

Third

52

52

48

Fourth

71

68

73

Fifth

76

62

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

While the data for students above the 50th percentile is constantly being evaluated, the data for those children in the bottom quartile also needs to be carefully analyzed to make sure more students are not falling further behind.  In order to do this the percent of students in the bottom quartile was tallied for each testing session.  The expectation would be for the percent of students in the bottom quartile to decrease as the year progresses.

The results are in the following chart.  Every grade level shows an increase in the percent of students in the bottom quartile in math.

 

 

 

Percent of Students Below the 26th Percentile

Math

Grade

Fall

Winter

Spring

Kindergarten

5

10

10

First

20

23

27

Second

13

26

21

Third

17

22

26

Fourth

7

11

12

Fifth

19

24

24

 

 

 

 

 

A chart comparing the percent of students above the 50th percentile in reading and math (spring scores) for each grade level is shown below.  While most grades showed a comparable percentage in reading and math, there is a major discrepancy in third grade.    This grade had a significantly higher scores in reading than in math (30%).

 

 

Percent of Students Above the 50th Percentile in Reading and Math

Grade

Reading

Math

Kindergarten

81

76

First

47

47

Second

57

64

Third

78

48

Fourth

77

73

Fifth

57

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Standards of Learning for Virginia public schools describe the Commonwealth's expectations for student learning and achievement in grades K-5 in reading, writing, mathematics, science, history/social science, technology, the fine arts, and health/physical education.  These standards represent what Virginia’s Department of Education believes schools should teach and students should learn.

In the four core areas (English, mathematics, science, and history/social science) a curriculum framework is provided that details the specific knowledge and skills students must possess to meet the standards for these subjects.

The following chart shows the raw data from the spring 2016 Standards of Learning tests.  Raven’s pass rate for reading was 79% which is above the Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) of 72% set by the federal government.  The pass rate for math was 76% which is above the AMO of 68%.  These scores also exceed Virginia’s requirements for accreditation which are 75% in reading and 70% in math.  This shows that Raven’s students have made significant improvement in both reading and math during the 2015-16 school year.  The school as a whole as well as all grade levels met the requirements as set by the state and federal government.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015– 2016 Standards of Learning Online Testing Analysis :Raw Data

 

Does Not Include Recovery and AMO Adjustments

 

 

 

% Pass/Proficient

% Pass/Advanced

Total % Passing

% Fail

 

% Pass/Proficient

% Pass/Advanced

Total % Passing

% Fail

3rd Grade Reading

61%

13%

74%

26%

4th Grade Reading

73%

8%

81%

19%

5th Grade Reading

61%

22%

83%

17%

Total Reading

65%

14%

79%

21%

 

% Pass/Proficient

% Pass/Advanced

Total % Passing

% Fail

3rd Grade Math

61%

9%

70%

30%

4th Grade Math

69%

12%

81%

19%

5th Grade Math

45%

32%

77%

23%

Total Math

59%

17%

76%

24%

 

% Pass/Proficient

% Pass/Advanced

Total % Passing

% Fail

VA Studies

(tested in 4th Grade)

35%

46%

81%

19%

 

 

 

 

 

5th Grade Science

69%

22%

91%

9%

 

 

 

 

The Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS) is the state-provided screening tool for Virginia’s Early Intervention Reading Initiative, and is used by 99% of school districts in Virginia.  PALS consists of three screening instruments PALS Pre-K, PALS-K, and PALS 1-3. These instruments measure young children’s knowledge of important literacy fundamentals including phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge, knowledge of letter sounds, spelling, concept of word, word recognition in isolation, and oral passage reading.

 The major purpose of PALS is to identify those students who are below grade-level expectations in these areas and may be in need of additional reading instruction funded through the Early Intervention Reading Initiative (EIRI).  PALS can also be used as a diagnostic tool to provide teachers with explicit information about their students’ knowledge of literacy fundamentals to help guide their teaching.

In the fall of 2015 all kindergarten students were tested.  Raven did not have any students in grades 1-3 who were required to be tested.  Data showing the number identified in grades one and two is from the previous spring.  All K-2 students were tested in the spring.

 

The following chart shows the results of PALS testing in grades K-2.

 

 

PALS Data for 2015-16

 

Level

Total Screened Fall 2015

 

 

Number Identified

Fall 2015

Percent

Identified

Fall 2015

 

 

Total Screened

Spring 2016

 

Number Identified

Spring 2016

Percent

Identified

Spring 2016

Kindergarten

21

4

19%

21

3

14%

First Grade

18

8

44%

15

4

27%

Second Grade

34

10

29%

28

7

25%

 

 

The PALS data shows a decrease in both the number and percent of students identified in all three grades that were tested.  The decrease is especially noticeable in grade one which went from 44% identified to 27%.

Another assessment that is administered in kindergarten is the kindergarten screener.  This assessment, which consists of letter name recognition, letter sounds, rhyme recognition, rhyme production, initial sound match, and initial sound production was administered in the fall and again in the spring.  In the fall, the average percent correct for kindergartners was 59%.  That had increased to 93% by the spring. 


The other component of the Needs Assessment is the survey sent home to parents.  Surveys were sent home with each student in the school.  Approximately 136 surveys were given out and 91 were returned which represents a 67% return rate. The results were tallied and can be found in Appendix D.

 There was an overwhelmingly positive response to the Title I program.  Most parents (98%) felt their child has benefitted from the program.  98% also felt their child has improved in reading, while 100% believe their child has improved in math skills this year.  There was an increase in the percentage of respondents who stated they had attended a Title I meeting this year from 34% last year to 51% this year.  There was also an increase, from (45% to 70%) in those who say they have met a Title I teacher.  While 86% state they have seen test results from standardized testing, only 7% feel they need assistance in interpreting test results.

Most respondents (50) prefer meetings be held at night, but a significant number (36) state they would like meetings to be held during the school day.  This will be taken into consideration in planning the meetings for next year.  The parents were asked on the surveys which programs they would like to see offered in 2016-17.  Some of the responses were: reading, math, tutoring, and spelling.  

Most respondents (77) prefer to be informed by notes.  Information will still be posted on the school and teacher web pages, but since 25% do not have internet at home, notes will be sent concerning any activities that are planned.

76% of those responding to the survey indicate they are aware materials are available for checkout from the Parent Resource Center.  Only 6% said they knew of additional materials they would like to be made available for checkout. 


2.   Schoolwide reform strategies that:  Provide opportunities for all children to meet the State’s proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement.

 

During the 2016-17 school year Tazewell County schools will continue to operate under the guidelines from the reading grant even though the six year grant cycle is completed.  The goal is for schools to have 90% of all students reading on grade level by the end of third grade.

Materials through the SRA Imagine It! reading program will continue to be used.  Under the Tazewell County Reading Initiative, the reading block for grades K-3 consists of one hour of whole group instruction provided by the classroom teacher.  This hour can incorporate spelling, grammar, and writing.  The second hour is spent in small group workshops.  Another hour is devoted to the intervention portion of the reading program (Reading Mastery). Classroom teachers, Title I teachers, Special Education Teachers, PALS tutors, and resource personnel conduct workshops and Reading Mastery groups. 

An intervention program known as Reading Mastery consisting of Language for Learning, Reading Mastery, and Corrective Reading is another component of the grant.  Staff development and support from reading consultants is a vital part of this grant. 

Raven Elementary will continue as a pilot school using an alternate method of Reading Mastery.  All kindergarten, first, and second grade students will receive instruction using the full inclusion model for Reading Mastery.  These students have been screened for placement in Reading Mastery.   In addition the language and spelling components of the program will be incorporated.

The students will receive two hours of instruction in Reading Mastery.  This will replace the workshop hour that was being used with Imagine It.  Thirty to forty-five minutes of the two hour block will be spent on language.  Another 10-15 minutes will be spent on spelling.  The goal of spending two hours per day in Reading Mastery is to accelerate student progress. Any third graders who still qualify for Reading Mastery will move into Corrective Reading.

 All teachers in grades kindergarten through two have received training in Reading Mastery.   Whole group instruction through Imagine It! will still be incorporated into the schedule.

            The Tazewell County Reading Academic Initiative also includes an assessment piece, Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test, which is administered three times per year.  The results of the test will be used to group third grade students into workshop groups based on ability.  PALS tutors, Title I teachers, and Special Education teachers work with those students who scored in the lower percentiles on the MAP test.  The kindergarten screener is given to kindergartners in the fall and spring.

            The MAP data shows growth in reading for most grades.  Third and fourth grades both had at least a 20% increase in students above the 50th percentile.  First grade showed a decrease in students at the 50th percentile from fall to spring.  However, these students took the primary reading test in the fall and the 2-5 reading test in the spring which makes it difficult to compare the results. All grade levels except first grade had at least 50% of their students at or above the 50th percentile by the end of the year.  Looking at the students who scored in the bottom quartile at the end of the year shows major improvement. Ten percent or less of kindergarten, third, and fifth graders scored in the bottom quartile.  There is still a significant percent of students in first and second grades in the bottom quartile.  These students will need extra support in reading. Therefore, we will concentrate our reading resources in grades K-3 next year.

 

The PALS data shows a decrease in both the number and percent of students identified in all three grades that were tested.  The decrease is especially noticeable in grade one which went from 44% identified to 27%.           

The results of the MAP math test show a weakness in math in first and third grades.  Both grades had over one-fourth of the students in the bottom quartile but almost half of the students in those two grades scored at or above the 50th percentile.  All other grades had at least 50% of the students at or above the 50th percentile.    

Raven’s pass rate on the reading Standards of Learning (SOL) test was 79% which is above the Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) of 72% set by the federal government.   The pass rate for math of 76% was above the AMO of 68%.  (Using raw data which does not include recovery and AMO adjustments).  These scores were also above the rate set by the state of Virginia for accreditation which is 75% in reading and 70% in math.

Overall our scores on the SOL tests are well within the guidelines set by the state and federal government.  All grades met the standards in reading and math.

Based on all of the data gathered, rising second and third grades need extra support in reading, while rising second, third, and fourth grades need extra support in math.  There will only be one Title I teacher at Raven next year which will make it difficult to serve all students effectively.

As personnel allows we will continue with the total inclusion model of Reading Mastery in kindergarten, first, and second grades and teach Corrective Reading in third grade.  We plan to serve second, third, and fourth grades in math.  If time and personnel allow, fifth grade will be served in math.  We will use small group instruction based on need and include manipulatives, alternate strategies, computer programs, and outside resources.

 

Raven Elementary School also provides other opportunities for student involvement.  Some of those are listed below.

Supplemental Opportunities:

●      Creating home libraries by providing free books for children and parents during the school year

●     Access to a book exchange

●     Parent/Child Night activities geared toward instructional needs

      • William King Art Center presentation
      • DARE
      • 4-H
      • Reading, spelling, and geography bees
      • Van Gogh art project
      • Laws For Life essay contest
      • SATIRA
      • Children’s Bible Ministry
      • Family Nutrition Program
      • Partnership with public library
      • Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports

 3.  Instruction by highly qualified professionals

Tazewell County Schools have, as part of the hiring process, the regulation that all members of a school staff, both professional and paraprofessional, be highly qualified.

The members of our highly qualified staff and their endorsements are listed below:

 

Position

Name

Endorsement

Principal

Ann Walls

Master’s Degree

Elementary School Principal

Early Education NK-4

Middle Education 4-8

Kindergarten

Shena Hubbard

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education PreK-6

First Grade

Debbie Vencill

Bachelor’s Degree

Early Education NK-4

Second Grade

Tammy Rose

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education PreK-6

Second Grade

Jodie Mitchell

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education PreK-6

Third Grade

Stephanie Mullins

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education PreK-6

Fourth Grade

Jennie Shortridge

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education PreK-6

Middle Education 6-8: English

History/Social Studies

Fifth Grade

Brittany Sparks

Bachelor’s Degree

Elementary Education Pre-K-6


 

 

 

 TEACHERS:

Position

Name

Endorsement

Title I Reading/Math

Emma Fisher

Master’s Degree

Reading Specialist

Early Education NK-4

Mathematics

Middle Education 4-8

Title I Reading/Math

Valerie Rose

Master’s Degree

Reading Specialist

Early Education NK-4

General Mathematics

Middle Education 4-8

Physical Education

Adam Davis

Bachelor’s Degree

Health and P.E. Pre K-12

Guidance

 Jacqueline Phillips

Master’s Degree

Early Education NK-4

Elementary and Middle School Counselor

Media Specialist

Savannah Shupe

Bachelor’s Degree

Middle Ed. 6-8 English

Elementary Education Pre K-6

Library Media Pre K-12

Resource

Carolyn Michaels

Bachelor’s Degree

Specific Learning Disabilities K-12

 

 


Paraprofessionals:

Position
Name
Highly Qualified

Instructional Assistant

Angela Moose
Yes

Developmental Assistant

Jamey Brown

Yes

Instructional Assistant

Tonyia Absher

Yes

Developmental Assistant

Amanda Cordill

Yes

PALS Tutor

Dawn Berry

Yes

PALS Tutor

Laura Fletcher

Yes

PALS Tutor

Christina Ray

Yes

 

All members of the staff at Raven Elementary are considered highly qualified.  If a position at Raven Elementary becomes available, the Human Resource office of Tazewell County Schools will interview only those candidates who are designated as “highly qualified”. 

Continuation of professional development to maintain a highly qualified staff will be held each semester.  Classes and opportunities for professional development in content areas and in classroom management areas will be held. 
4.  Professional Development

 

High quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, paraprofessionals, and other staff is aligned to the Standards of Learning and tied to the school’s needs assessment. Continuing training through the Reading Initiative will be offered.  Building and countywide staff development opportunities will be made available, and funds will be allocated to ensure sufficient resources are provided for children in the school to meet the student academic achievement standards. 

Teachers will be required to obtain 36 hours of staff development.  Two days are incorporated in the school calendar.  Teachers must complete an additional 24 hours of staff development outside of the school day.    This can be accomplished through school level staff development, workshops, reading and responding to professional articles, and completing assignments on PD360, an online professional development website.  In addition the following resources are provided:

 

·         Extensive professional library maintained in the media center

·         Time allocated to evaluate student progress

·         Ongoing assessment training

·         Mentors for all new teachers

·         Collaboration between grade levels

·         County workshop offerings

·         Professional articles

·         Conferences/workshops/meetings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Staff development activities planned for the year include the following:

·         Gifted seminar

·         Celebration of Success

·         Technology Blast

·         Karen Blevins—Technology training

·         Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports (PBIS)

·         Book Study—Data Wise edited by Boudett, City, and Murnane

·         Tamara Williams and Susan Rash—Reading support

·         Farm Bureau—Sprouting Success in the Classroom

·         Sharon Rice—Virginia Cooperative Extension

·         Office 365 Training

·         School Improvement Plan

·         Accreditation Team  SOQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Strategies to hire highly qualified teachers

 

Guidelines for hiring qualified teachers are in section 3 and are not an issue at this time.  We are already meeting this component.


  1. Strategies to increase parental involvement:

 

NOTE:   Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a written school-parent involvement policy jointly with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A, activities, services, and programs.  That policy must comply with Section 1118(b) of the ESEA and shall describe the means for carrying out the requirements of subsections (c) through (f). 

 

Raven Elementary School jointly developed this parental involvement policy in consultation with school personnel and parents and adopted it on May 10, 2016.  A list of committee members responsible for the writing of this policy can be found in Appendix A.  This policy will be distributed to parents in September 2016 and to the extent practicable, provided in a language the parents can understand. This policy shall be made available to the local community by placing it on the school Web page and the county Title I webpage.  If the Title I plan (application) is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, Tazewell County Public Schools will submit any parent comments with the application when the plan is submitted to the state. This parent involvement plan will be updated annually to meet the changing needs of parents and the school.

 

Part 1.  POLICY INVOLVEMENT

 

Raven Elementary School will:

 

(1)    Convene an annual meeting on Tuesday, September 13, 2016 to which all parents shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents of their school's participation in Title I and to explain the requirements of Title I, and the right of the parents to be involved;

(2)    Offer a flexible number of meetings.  A schedule of this year’s meetings can be found in Appendix B;

(3)    Involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of the school’s Title I program, including the planning, review, and improvement of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan;

(4)     Provide parents of:

(A)  timely information about Title I programs;

(B)   a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and

(C)   if requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children, and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible; and

(5)    If the schoolwide program is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, submit any parent comments on the plan when the school makes the plan available to the local educational agency.

 

Part 2.  SHARED RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HIGH STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

 

(From Parent Involvement: Title I, Part A- Non-Regulatory Guidance, pp. 51-55)

 

 NOTE:   Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a written school-parent compact jointly with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A, activities, services, and programs.  That compact is part of the school’s written parental involvement policy developed by the school and parents under Section 1118(b) of the ESEA.  The compact must outline how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the state’s high standards. 

 

*          *          *          *          *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT

 

 

Raven Elementary School and the parents of the students participating in activities, services, and programs funded by Title I, Part A, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), agree that this compact outlines how the parents, the school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement. Also, the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership that will help children achieve the state’s high standards.

This school-parent compact is in effect during school year 2016-17.

 

School Responsibilities

 

        Raven Elementary School will:

                       

  1. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children to meet the state’s student academic achievement standards as follows:

 

Reading/Writing Curriculum

At the primary level, students use a phonics-based approach to decode, read fluently, and comprehend written text. Writing skills are introduced and practiced.

At the intermediate level, students read and comprehend a variety of materials across all subject areas that lead to college and/or career success. Writing skills continue to improve and expand to connect to real-world application.

 

·         Continue the current program having all K-2 students involved in the Reading Mastery program.

·         Continue with the Tazewell County reading initiative.

 

 

Math Curriculum

Students develop an understanding of mathematics in the following areas: whole numbers, fractions, decimals, operations, probability and statistics, measurement, and geometry. These skills allow students the ability to become problem solvers in real-life situations.

 

·         Continue with small group math classes in grades 2-4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessments

 

·         Kindergarten Screener

·         PALS

·         MAP

·         SOL

 

  1. Hold parent-teacher conferences biannually during which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual child’s achievement.  Specifically, those conferences will be held:

 

·         October 17, 2016

·         February 20, 2017

 

  1. Provide parents with frequent reports on their children’s progress.  Specifically, the school will provide reports as follows:

 

·         Progress reports

·         Parent Portal

·         Dojo

·         Results of testing:  MAP,  PALS, and SOL

·         Classroom notes

·         Communication folders

·         Phone calls

·         Email

 

  1. Provide parents reasonable access to staff.  Specifically, staff will be available for consultation with parents as follows:

 

·         During planning time

·         Before and after school by appointment

·         Parent Teacher conferences

 

 

 

  1. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and to observe classroom activities, as follows:

 

·         PBIS activities

·         Parent organization

·         AR program

·         Field day

·         Arts and crafts projects

·         Career Day

·         Class parties

 

Parent Responsibilities

We, as parents, will support our children’s learning in the following ways:

 

 

·         Monitoring attendance.

·         Making sure that homework is completed.

·         Volunteering in my child’s classroom if possible.

·         Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my child’s education.

·         Promoting positive use of my child’s extracurricular time.

·         Staying informed about my child’s education and communicating with the school by promptly reading all notices from the school and returning as necessary.

·         Attending Parent/Teacher conferences and Title I PAC meetings as time permits.

 

Student Responsibilities

 

I, as a student, will share the responsibility to improve my academic achievement and achieve the State’s high standards.  Specifically, I will:

 

 

·         Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need it.

·         Read at least 20 minutes every day outside of school time.

·         Give my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices and information received by me from my school every day.

·         Try my best.

·         Be respectful.

 

 

Additional Required School Responsibilities

 

Raven Elementary School will:

 

1.                  Involve parents in the planning, review, and improvement of the school’s parental involvement policy, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way.

 

2.                  Involve parents in the joint development of any schoolwide program plan, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way.

 

3.                  Hold an annual meeting to inform parents of the school’s participation in Title I, Part A programs, and to explain the Title I, Part A requirements, and the right of parents to be involved in Title I, Part A programs.  The school will convene the meeting at a convenient time to parents, and will offer a flexible number of additional parental involvement meetings, such as in the morning or evening, so that as many parents as possible are able to attend.  The school will invite to this meeting all parents and will encourage them to attend. 

4.                  Provide information to parents in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon the request of parents with disabilities, and, to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can understand.

 

5.                  Provide to parents information in a timely manner about Title I, Part A programs that includes a description and explanation of the school’s curriculum, the forms of academic assessment used to measure children’s progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet.

 

6.                  On the request of parents, provide opportunities for regular meetings for parents to formulate suggestions, and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions about the education of their children.  The school will respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible.

 

7.                  Provide to each parent an individual student report about the performance of their child on the State assessment in at least math, language arts and reading.

 

 

Part 3.  BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT

 

To ensure effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership among the school, parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement, Raven Elementary School and Tazewell County Public Schools assisted under this part:

 

(1)        shall provide assistance to parents of children served by Raven Elementary School and Tazewell County Public Schools, as appropriate, in understanding such topics as the state's academic content standards and State student academic achievement standards, state and local academic assessments; also monitor a child's progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children;

(2)        shall provide materials and training to help parents work with their children to improve individual achievement, such as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental involvement;

(3)        shall educate teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and other staff, with the assistance of parents, in the value and utility of contributions of parents; and how to communicate and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school;

(4)        shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Virginia Preschool Initiative, public preschool and other programs; conduct other activities such as parent resource centers that encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children;

(5)        shall ensure that information related to school and parent programs,         meetings, and other activities is sent to the parents in a format that is practicable and in a language that parents can understand;

(6)        may arrange school meetings at a variety of times, or conduct in-home conferences between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children, with parents who are unable to attend such conferences at school, in order to maximize parental involvement and participation;

(7)        shall provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under this section as parents may request.

 

 

 

Part 4.  ACCESSIBILITY

 

Raven Elementary School, to the extent practicable, shall provide full opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children, in a format that is practicable and in a language that parents can understand.

 

 

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

We have read and agree to the policies of the School-Parent Compact for Raven Elementary during the school year 2016-17.

 

 

 

 

__________________            __________________           

Teacher                                    Parent(s)                                 

 

 

__________________            __________________           

Date                                        Date                                       

 

 

 

 

            __________________            _________________              _________________

            Student          

 

 

  1. Preschool Transition Strategies

 

 Raven Elementary School collaborates with private preschools, daycares, and Head Start by providing an opportunity for students who attend these programs to visit with the kindergarten classes in the spring.  These students tour the school, visit a kindergarten classroom, and eat lunch with the kindergarten students.  Tazewell County dedicates a month for registration for kindergarten and Pre-K students.  Raven has one day when the school stays open extra hours to facilitate registration.

Kindergarten Kamp is a week long program offered the week before school begins to all entering kindergarten students.  The purpose is to help students become familiar with school routines.  This program is free for all students and transportation is provided. 

A Back to School Night is also offered before school starts.  This is an opportunity for parents and students of all grade levels to come into the school and meet with the teachers.  Schedules, routines, lunch/snack costs, and expectations for the year are discussed.  Teachers also discuss the Standards of Learning, explain the academic expectations for the students, and introduce the parents to county policies.  Parents can meet privately with the teacher if they desire, tour the school, and familiarize themselves with the school facility.        


8.       Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions

Raven Elementary will administer different assessments during the school year. (See Appendix C).  These assessments will be used to make instructional decisions, monitor student progress, and reevaluate previous instruction.  Student performance drives the decisions concerning pacing of instruction, remediation, and enrichment. 

Results of the MAP tests will be used to group students for math.  After the initial placement the groups will change depending on the needs of the students.

Students in grades K-3 will be given a placement test to be placed in a Reading Mastery group.  These groups are fluid.  Students can change to a different group based on their performance in the program. 

 

 


9.  Effective and Timely Assistance

 

            Students who are having difficulty mastering state standards shall be provided effective and timely additional assistance.

            In the 2016-17 school year the PALS test will be administered to students in grades K, 1, and 2.  Third graders will be tested at the teacher’s discretion.  MAP tests will be given to students in grades K-5 three times during the year.  After each testing period, the data will be disaggregated and instruction realigned.

 Interactive Achievement benchmark tests will be available in all subjects for third, fourth, and fifth grades.  Teachers will choose the ones they wish to give at the end of each unit of study.  The results of these tests will be used to inform classroom teachers of academic areas needing remediation.  These tests also help teachers adhere to the pacing guide.  Students in grades 3-5 will be tested on the state Standards of Learning.  In addition to this formal testing, all grades will use the benchmark tests which are part of the Imagine It! reading program. 

During the 2016-17 school year, the data will be disaggregated by the principal, classroom teachers, special education teachers, and Title I teachers.   The teachers will realign their instruction to meet the students’ needs.  As part of the Reading Initiative one hour of the reading block in third grade will be spent in small group workshop.  The workshop groups will be determined by scores on the spring MAP tests.  If a teacher feels that a student has been misplaced in a workshop group, additional data will be collected and presented to the reading coach.  The reading coach, teacher, and principal will discuss placement of the student and make a change in the student’s workshop placement, if warranted.

Schoolwide Title I allows for flexible grouping to occur immediately after screening and assessments.  This allows for all students to have immediate intervention and/or acceleration. Title I and Special Education personnel work with the students with the lowest MAP scores.  

During the 2016-17 school year Raven Elementary will continue to offer the full inclusion model of the Reading Mastery program.  This program is administered through Title I.  The Title I teacher at Raven has received extensive training in Reading Mastery and currently teaches several groups of Reading Mastery.  Kindergarten, first, and second grade teachers have received training and support for the Reading Mastery program.  PALS tutors and developmental assistants have also received training and teach additional groups.

 All kindergarten, first, and second grade students have been screened for placement in Reading Mastery instruction.   Flexible grouping is used in this program, and students will be moved as needed.  We will also be using the language and spelling components of the program. 

The students will receive two hours of instruction in Reading Mastery. Thirty minutes of the two hour block will be spent on language.  Another 10-15 minutes will be spent on spelling.  The goal of spending two hours per day in Reading Mastery is to accelerate student progress.  Any third graders who still qualify for Reading Mastery will use Corrective Reading this year. One hour of whole group instruction through Imagine It! will be incorporated into the schedule.

At the beginning of the school year, students will be placed in groups for math based on their spring math MAP scores.  Throughout the year, classroom teachers will determine the grouping of students for intervention.  Some teachers will also use the results of Interactive Achievement testing to place the students in groups.

            Students will have access to the computer lab several times a week to provide needed practice time for computer proficiency.   Students who did not pass last year’s SOL tests will be allowed to go to the computer lab before school to work on needed skills.   Any programs which are purchased by the county will be made available for schoolwide use.


10.  Coordination and Integration

 

Raven’s schoolwide program will be supported by Tazewell County Public Schools and supplemental funds from the following:

 

  • Community contributions from local organizations - Woman’s club, local discount stores, churches, businesses, Board of Supervisors, and private parties make donations of money or supplies for students and teachers.

 

  • In-kind support
    • Soil and Water Commission set up labs for water study for the students
    • Kiwanis Club provides books
    • First Sentinel bank provides books
    • Churches supply backpacks of food weekly for selected students
    • Local church provides coats for students
    • The Elgin Initiative provides dental support for all students
    • Clinch Valley Community Action provides services for students
    • 4-H provides resources--gardening and nutrition
    • McTeacher Night
    • Food City receipts
    • Box Tops for Education
    • Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech provides lessons for the Family Nutrition Program
    • Food and Fiber
    • Virginia Tech Career Awareness Day
    • Seedlings for students
    • Appalachian Power
    • Partnership with public library to offer summer reading programs
    • Kidz Summer Supper—monthly family meeting with supper provided by local churches

 

  • Title I - funds used to supplement the regular classroom instruction by correlating the needs of the regular class with the Title I program as indicated by the needs assessment of each class.
  • Title II – Limited funds are available to maintain highly qualified staff.  A supervisor in the local school board office distributes these funds. 
  • Title III - Raven Elementary School will provide individual student academic assessment results in a language the parents can understand, including an interpretation of those results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix A

Planning Team

 

Ann Walls                        Principal

Emma Fisher                           Title I Teacher

Valerie Rose                     Title I Teacher

Amanda Kitts                   Parent

Chris Kitts                        Parent

Larissa Belcher                 Parent

Ashley Dales                           Parent

Alice Dye                         Parent

Debbie Vencill                 Primary Teacher

Jennie Shortridge                    Intermediate Teacher

 

 


 

Appendix B

Schedule of Title I PAC Meetings

 

September 13, 2016              6:00 p.m.

Back to School Night Potluck                                                       Discussion of Title I Parental Involvement Plan

 

November 15, 2016              6:00 p. m.

Parent/Child Night        

Various math activities

 

March 28, 2017                     8:30 a.m.

          Breakfast meeting 

  Explanation of upcoming testing

 


 

 

MAP Reading test

MAP Math test

PALS

Kindergarten Screener

Imagine It! Benchmark

Tests

Interactive Achievement Benchmark Tests

SOL Tests

K

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

1

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

2

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

3

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

4

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

5

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Appendix C


Appendix D

 

Title I is a federally funded program that offers students additional help in reading and math. The Title I program has specific goals and activities that must be addressed throughout the school year.  We would appreciate your input on the following survey so we can continue to improve Tazewell County Schools’ Title I Program.  Please complete this survey and return by Friday, April 22.

 

 

YES

NO

  1. Have you attended any school-based Title I parent meetings or trainings this year?  (Computer Night, Internet Safety/Dr. Seuss, or Testing Meeting)

 

51%

 

49%

  1. When would you prefer that parent meetings be held? 

_36_  During school hours        _50__  At night

 

 

  1. How do you prefer to be informed of activities?  Check all that apply:  77  Notes     30  Email        43  Phone     18   Website

 

 

 

  1. Have you met a Title I teacher this year?  (Emma Fisher  or Valerie Rose)

 

70%

 

30%

  1. I feel knowledgeable about the Title I program.

 

 

89%

 

11%

  1. Have you noticed an improvement in your child’s reading ability this year?

 

98%

 

2%

  1. Have you noticed an improvement in your child’s math ability this year?

 

100%

 

0

  1. Have you seen test results (PALS, MAP, or SOL) that support this?

 

86%

 

14%

  1. Do you need assistance in understanding any of your child’s test results?

 

 

7%

 

93%

  1. Do you think the Title I program has been beneficial in improving your child’s overall educational experience?

 

 

98%

 

2%

  1. Are you aware that materials can be checked out from the Title I classrooms?

 

 

76%

 

24%

  1. Do you know of any material that you would like to have available for check-out for your child?  If so, please list.

 

 

6%

 

94%

  1. Do you have a home computer with Internet connection?

 

 

75%

 

25%

  1. What Title I trainings or programs would you like to see offered next year that would help your child in school or assist you in helping your child?

 

 

 

This plan was developed during a one year period and will be reviewed and revised annually, as needed.  It will be available to the public, and it is written in an understandable and uniform format.  

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